Leopard 10.5.2 VMware Installation Guide



[Mac OSx86] Leopard 10.5.2 VMware Installation Guide PDF Print E-mail
Written by Administrator   
Saturday, 29 March 2008
Description:
The long awaited guide on how to run Leopard on VMware!
**********
Leopard on VMwareZoom
Note: If you want a prepared virtual machine with everything already done for you (Leopard install and all) gohere.
What you need:
  • Intel or AMD SSE3 processor (733MHz minimum)
  • Leopard Flat Image OSx86
  • VMware Workstation 6 or VMware Server
  • Windows 32bit or 64bit or a distro of Linux that can run VMware
  • Atleast 512MB of RAM, 2GB is recommended
  • An already working Tiger VMware install on VMware Workstation (use this guide to get that working)
  • PC EFI v8 ZIP (download here)
  • ToH 9.1.0 Kernel (download here )
  • If you want to install 10.5.2 you also need the Kalyway 10.5.2 Combo Updater (from TPB), the kalyway 10.5.2 kernels mpkg (from here ), netkas’s 9.2.0 SpeedStep kernel (download here ), mac.nub’s SMBIOS27 Default (download here), and the Leopard Graphics Update 1.0 from Apple (download here )
  • qemu-img.exe 0.8.1 with imgover4g fix if you are using Windows (download here )
  • qemu-img.exe 0.9.1 if you are using Linux (download here , comes with a bunch of other tools but qemu-img is the one you need)
  • About 20GB of free HD space


Converting the Leopard flat image to the right format:


MD5 Checksums
leopard-x86.rar:
d1b87fe6a4d27966435ce82895a9ae7b


leopard-x86-flat-img
5fa34f8793d641b63d5102c5e87bdc44


Note for Linux: If you are doing this on Linux, note that all the file paths in this step are Windows only. Adjust the file paths as necessary for your linux system.
  • First of all, create a new directory in the ROOT of your C: drive called “leo”. This is where all our files will go.
  • Get the Leopard flat image and there is a RAR file, unzip the RAR (unzipping takes a long time) file to the leo folder on your desktop and there will be a file called “leopard-x86-flat-img
  • Rename leopard-x86-flat-img to leopard.img (You may get some warnings about changing the extension, just accept)
  • Download the qemu-img.zip file (at the top in the What you need section) and unzip the qemu-img.exe file in the archive into the leo folder
  • Open a new command prompt in Windows. Execute the following commands:

cd C:/leo
qemu-img convert -O vmdk leopard.img leopard.vmdk

  • That last command will create a leopard.vmdk file in your leo folder. It will take a long time. You will know whem the command is finished when it returns to the “C:/leo>” command prompt. The resulting leopard.vmdk file should be 6.85GB in size


Mounting the leopard VMDK file in VMware

  • Open VMware Workstation and open your *working* Tiger virtual machine
  • The guest OS of the virtual machine should be set to FreeBSD or FreeBSD 64-bit (recommended)
  • Go to the VM menu >> Settings and click Add
  • Choose Hard Disk and click Next, choose the “Use an existing virtual disk” option and click Next. Browse to your leopard.vmdk disk file and click Finish
  • The disk should be mounted as a secondary drive for your virtual machine
  • Boot your virtual machine and it should go into your working Tiger install
  • If you get an error about a 64bit OS on 32bit and get a VMware stack error, change the guest OS to FreeBSD 64-bit
  • Once booted up, the Leopard volume should be mounted and ready


Backing up and deleting some bad kexts

  • In Tiger, open a new Terminal window and run the following commands:



sudo -s
[enter password]
mkdir /pcwizbackup
cp -r /Volumes/Leopard/System/Library/Extensions/AppleIntelCPUPowerManagement.kext /Volumes/Leopard/pcwizbackup/
cp -r /Volumes/Leopard/System/Library/Extensions/AppleEFIRuntime.kext /Volumes/Leopard/pcwizbackup/
rm -rf /Volumes/Leopard/System/Library/Extensions/AppleIntelCPUPowerManagement.kext
rm -rf /Volumes/Leopard/System/Library/Extensions/AppleEFIRuntime.kext
rm -rf /Volumes/Leopard/System/Library/Extensions.mkext




Installing ToH kernel and netkas EFI SMBIOS

  • Make a new ISO image file that contains the ToH kernel and the PC EFI v8 zip
  • This can be done with various ways, in Windows I used MagicISO Maker (linux tools may be different)
  • Still in your running Tiger VMware machine, right click the CD icon in the bottom right corner and click Edit
  • Make sure that the “Use ISO image” radio button is checked
  • Browse to your ISO image you created and click OK to mount the CD ISO
  • Now a new CD image should appear on your Tiger desktop
  • If it doesn’t, drag any existing CD icons to the trash, right click the CD icon in the bottom right corner of your VM window, click Disconnect, then click Connect to “refresh” it
  • Anyway now with the CD on your desktop, open up the CD and copy over the mach_toh kernel zip and the pc efi zip to your Desktop
  • Unzip the ToH kernel zip, there will be a file called “mach_toh”. Rename it to “mach_kernel”
  • Unzip the pc efi zip and there will be a folder called “pc_efi_v80” on your desktop.
  • Inside the pc efi folder there is an AppleSMBIOS.kext file, move the kext to the desktop
  • Rename the pc_efi_v80 folder to “iamefi” and move it to the ROOT of your TIGER partition
  • You should have mach_kernel and AppleSMBIOS.kext sitting on your Desktop
  • Run the following commands from Terminal:



sudo -s
[enter password]
mkdir /pcwizbackup
cp /Volumes/Leopard/mach_kernel /Volumes/Leopard/mach_kernel.flatbackup
cp -r /Volumes/Leopard/System/Library/Extensions/AppleSMBIOS.kext /Volumes/Leopard/pcwizbackup/
rm -rf /Volumes/Leopard/System/Library/Extensions/AppleSMBIOS.kext
cp -r ~/Desktop/mach_kernel /Volumes/Leopard/mach_kernel
cp -r ~/Desktop/AppleSMBIOS.kext /Volumes/Leopard/System/Library/Extensions/




Find out disk identifier for Leopard volume
  • First, right click on the CD icon on the bottom right corner of your VM window and click Disconnect
  • Now unmount any CDs you have on your Tiger desktop (drag them to Trash)
  • Open a new Terminal window and run this command:




diskutil list
  • It will give you a list of all your disks
  • Find the one that says Leopard and check the disk identifier, mine was disk1s1
  • Remember this identifier


Install PC_EFI

  • Reboot your Tiger VM, but this time boot into single user mode (-s flag at boot: prompt)
  • Run the following commands:




/sbin/mount -uw /
cd /iamefi
./startupfiletool /dev/rdiskXsY ./boot_v5

  • On the last line change X and Y to your Leopard disk identifier, e.g. rdisk1s1
  • It should say something about HFS blocks written or something
  • You’re done! Your Leopard VM is ready for booting


Patching for AMD SSE3

  • You only need to do this if you have an AMD SSE3 processor (Intel works out of the box)
  • Firstly, you need to have a working Tiger VM (instructions here)
  • Mount the leopard.vmdk file as a virtual disk in the Tiger VM
  • Boot the Tiger VM and you should have access to the Leopard drive
  • Download Marvin’s AMD Utility here
  • Run it from the Tiger VM, for the “Volume/Directory to patch” choose your Leopard volume
  • Choose the “Patch all binaries” radio button and Patch
  • It will take a long time, but eventually it will be done
  • You should now be able to boot the Leopard VM properly
  • If it doesn’t work, tap F8 while the Leopard VM is booting to get to the boot: prompt and type in -v and hit Enter.


Create a new Leopard VM

  • Go to File >> New Virtual Machine and create a new VM (you should be familiar with this if you installed Tiger on VMware)
  • Choose Custom and not typical
  • Set the Hardware Compatibility to Workstation 6 and click Next
  • Set the guest OS to “Other” and set the Version to “FreeBSD 64-bit”
  • Give the virtual machine a name, and preferrably store it in a different partition from the one you are running Windows from, click Next
  • Set the number of processors to 1 (you can use 2 as well, but there is no visible speed increase) and click Next
  • Set the amount of memory to half your actual system memory and click Next (more the memory the faster)
  • Select “Use bridged networking” and click Next
  • Here, choose “Use an existing virtual disk” and click Next
  • Browse to and select your leopard.vmdk file that you converted and worked with and click Finish (if it asks you to convert or keep existing format, choose “Keep existing format”)
  • Back at the home screen, double click on the CD-ROM and in the dialog that pops up, uncheck the “Connect at power on” checkbox and click OK
  • Now go to the VM >> Settings menu and click and Remove the Floppy Drive and the USB Controller



Settings BIOS options


Note: To toggle between the guest OS and the host OS, press Ctrl + Alt

  • Make sure that all other virtual machines are turned off
  • Now boot your Leopard VM. Click inside the window immediately and tap F2 as fast as you can to get to the setup
  • In the main BIOS screen, choose the Legacy Diskette A and set it to Disabled
  • Go to the Advanced tab >> I/O Device Configuration and disable all Parallel, Floppy, and Serial controllers
  • Press F10 to save changes and reboot



Booting Leopard up for the first time



  • Back when you are rebooting after changing BIOS, click inside the VM window and tap F8 as fast as you can
  • You will eventually get to a boot: prompt
  • Type -v at the boot prompt and hit Enter
  • Watch the messages scroll by, leave it for 15-30 minutes until it boots
  • It will display the Welcome wizard eventually, go through it and you are in Leopard!
  • If it does not boot, go back to the F8 boot prompt and type in -v -x -f cpus=1 and hit Enter to see if it works




Update to 10.5.2
  • Take the Kalyway 10.5.2 Combo Update, the kalyway 10.5.2 kernels mpkg, netkas 9.2.0 kernel, mac.nub SMBIOS, and the Leopard Graphics Update 1.0 and put them all into a ISO
  • In your Leopard VM (assuming that Leopard is running and ready) right click the little CD-ROM icon in the bottom right corner and click Edit
  • Click on the “Use ISO image” radiobox and browse to your ISO containing the 10.5.2 update files, click OK
  • Now right click the little CD-ROM icon again and click Connect
  • In minutes, the CD-ROM should be mounted on your Leopard desktop
  • Go into the contents of the CD and drag everything to the desktop to copy it (this may take a while)
  • The first thing you want to do is double click the ZIP containing the Kalyway combo updater (the 340MB combo updater, not the kernels package) to unzip it (takes a long time)
  • Inside the unzipped folder there will be a Kalyway Combo Updater installer package. Run this installer package (just go through the install wizard, its really easy). It will take a really long time to install, even on a Core 2 Quad it to upwards of 30-40 minutes
  • When it tells you to click restart at the end, DO NOT RESTART
  • Now unzip the zip file containing the Kalyway kernels package (the small 6.4MB one). Run the kalyway kernels mpkg installer pkg inside
  • When it comes to the part where it asks you to select the kernel, choose the “patched kernel by modbin”
  • Click Close at the end of the installation
  • Now to install the netkas kernel and mac.nub SMBIOS, unzip both of the ZIPs so that you have mach_kernel and AppleSMBIOS.kext sitting on your desktop
  • Open the Terminal application from Applications >> Utilities folder and run the following commands:
sudo -s
[enter password]
mkdir /1052Backup
cp /mach_kernel /mach_kernel.toh
cp -r /System/Library/Extensions/AppleSMBIOS.kext /1052Backup/
rm -rf /System/Library/Extensions/AppleSMBIOS.kext
cp -r ~/Desktop/mach_kernel /mach_kernel
cp -r ~/Desktop/AppleSMBIOS.kext /System/Library/Extensions
  • Now, close Terminal and open the Disk Utiltiy application from Applications >> Utilities. Select your Leopard volume from the left pane, and click the Repair Permissions button (it takes a long time, wait till its done and close Disk Utility)
  • Now finally you can restart. Go back to the Kalyway Como Updater pkg and click the Restart button
  • It should reboot back into Leopard just fine, with no problems
  • The next thing to do is the Leopard Graphics Update, mount the Leopard Graphics Update DMG file (double click it)
  • Run the installer package inside the mounted DMG and Restart
  • All should be fine now, and you have Leopard with 10.5.2 working on VMware!



Ethernet

  • Ethernet might be working right after you start the VM (open Safari to test) but if it doesn’t work, heres how to set it up:
  • Open System Preferences from the Dock
  • Click on the Network preference pane
  • It will say that a new interface (en0) has been detected, choose the Ethernet Adapter from the left pane
  • Assuming that your internet is auto configuring DHCP, just click the Apply button.
  • Even if it says Cable disconnected or not connected, ignore it, Ethernet will still work
  • It will pull up all your DNS info and everything automatically, close System Preferences
  • You should be able to use Apple Software Update and go on the net fine!



Ethernet Method 2

  • If it still doesn’t work, here’s another method to do it (make sure that you have an Ethernet adapter configured as Bridged and that you have rebooted the virtual machine after adding the adapter)
  • Go back to System Preferences and open the Network preferences again
  • Click on Ethernet from the left pane and at the bottom click the Assist Me button
  • In the resulting dialog box click the Assistant button
  • The Network Setup Assistant will start up, give the Location a name and click Continue
  • Choose the “I use a cable modem to connect to the Internet” option
  • Click Continue again, and then it will take a moment and tell you that you can’t connect automatically and to enter some details
  • Without entering any details click Continue and click OK at the dialog box (this sort of “activates” the Ethernet)
  • Now click the Go Back button twice to get to the screen to choose a connection option
  • This time choose “I connect to my local area network (LAN)”
  • At the Ready to Connect screen click Continue and now it will give you a confirmation that you are connected
  • Click Done or whatever button and close System Preferences, Internet should be working








What doesn’t work
  • USB doesn’t work usually, but for some it did work. Add a USB Controller as a virtual device VMware if you want to try it
  • Sound partially works, but its too laggy and distorted to listen to
  • QE/CI doesn’t work obviously because there is no video driver for OS X on VMware


More VMware Resources from PCWiz:
  • Use the troubleshooting guide mentioned above to see if it will solve your problems
  • To contact us directly with your questions, click the Contact Us link in the main menu
  • Get help from others by posting your questions in the PCWiz Forums
  • See the OSx86 Project Wiki or the InsanelyMac Forums

~ by Ozl on September 7, 2008.

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